[Non/Future-included nation] Fed of Arab Republics [FAR]

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icehawk308
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[Non/Future-included nation] Fed of Arab Republics [FAR]

Postby icehawk308 » Tue 30 Dec 2014 06:09

Coalition Name: Federation of Arab Republics

Syria, Libya, Iraq

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federation ... _Republics
(last attempted union of socialist arab states which Iraq aspired to join but due to politics between it and Egypt it did not, until Egypt's westward tilt)

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After the 1973 War, Syrian President Hafez al-Assad made several attempts in 1974 and 1975 to settle his differences with Iraq (arising from Syria's acceptance of UN Resolution 338 which lead to the ceasefire in the 1973 War; Iraq withdrew the expeditionary force it had sent to help Syria as a result of Syria's acceptance of the ceasefire) and establish a union between the two countries. Iraq however rejected Assad's offers and denounced him for his "readiness to make peace" with Israel. Strained relations between Iraq and Syria would continue up until 1978.[3]

By October 1978, Iraq President, Ahmed Hassan al-Bakr began working closely with Assad to foil the Camp David Accords; signing in Baghdad a charter for Joint National Action which provided for the "closest form of unity ties" including "complete military unity" as well as "economic, political and cultural unification".[3]

In 1978 Iraqi President Ahmed Hassan al-Bakr and Hafez al-Assad, had agreed to a plan and started to make treaties that would lead to the unification of Iraq and Syria. This plan was to come into effect in July 1979, however Saddam Hussein, the Deputy Secretary of the Iraqi Ba'ath Party, fearful of losing his power to Assad (who was supposed to become the deputy leader in the new union), forced al-Bakr into retirement under threat of violence.[4][5]

Unity talks did continue between Assad and Hussein after July 1979, but Assad rejected Iraqi demands for a full merger between the two states and for the immediate deployment of Iraq troops into Syria. Instead Assad, perhaps fearful of Iraqi domination and a new war with Israel, advocated a step-by-step approach. The unity talks were eventually suspended indefinitely after an alleged discovery of a Syrian plot to overthrow Saddam Hussein.[3]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraq%E2%80 ... _relations

Exploring other potential nation states that can provide a great variety of flavour, we turn to Syria and Iraq as a REDFOR counter to Israel and Turkey in the region. By itself these nations dont necessarily match the strength of Israel (examined here viewtopic.php?f=104&t=50251) but mixing and matching them can provide some flavourful Coalition power. Detailed above is the political attempts at a merger between the two states in the 70s, which came very close to joining forces.

Syria
Overall Syria reminds one of East Germany. Quite trusted by the Soviets, they received kit not available to even the closest Communist allies (T-72A, Uragan etc). Their vehicle choices are limited but flavoured several ways which we will discover.

Items marked with an asterix are post 90s/OOTF but depending on level of balancing be included in the altered timeline.

Infantry

Hunter-Killer Tactics
By early 1982 the Syrians were expecting some kind of a new Israeli operation in southern Lebanon. Their commanders calculated that the IDF would most likely launch an attack similar to the Operation “Litani”, from 1978, when the Israelis drove only some 40km deep into Lebanon in a search for Palestinian terrorists. However, the Syrians knew that in the case the Israelis would not stop on the Litani River a major clash with IDF was inevitable. Yet, with most of Syrian Army important units being deployed either along the Golan Heights or in Damascus, and given the burden of sustaining a sizeable force inside Lebanon already since 1976, as well as because of their commitment in the local civil war, Damascus lacked assets and space to build a strong front-line stretching over whole width of Lebanon. In fact, by early June 1982 the majority of Syrian units in Lebanon was deployed in centre of the country, between Beirut and Zahle, with established defences only around specific points of interest - along the highway Beirut-Damascus, and especially in the area of the village of as-Sultan Yac'ub at Tanta.

Studying the local terrain, roads, dozens of villages in southern Lebanon and possible routes along which the Israelis could approach, the Syrians developed simple but effective tactics. This called for co-ordination between SyAAF helicopters and specially trained “hunter-killer teams” of the Syrian Army. The aim was to ambush and tie down Israeli mechanized formations by ground-forces, preferably at short range and within urban areas, and then hit them by attack helicopters that would approach using local hilly terrain.

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Fryq Alsyad-Alqatl (Hunter-Killer Team) - Veteran RPG-7V FIST
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As mentioned, the specific focus of the Syrian army in the 80s was dealing with the expert Israeli armored forces. Specially trained FIST teams with higher veterancy are a non powerful but flavour addition to the Syrian armed forces.

An upgraded FIST '90 variant could feature the RPG-29, also procured by the Syrian Army.

20 Commando Battalion
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By early June 1982 the SA had the whole 20 Commando Battalion with a total of 50 hunter-killer teams deployed in Lebanon, mainly in the areas south and west of Beirut, but also in eastern and southern suburbs of the city. Each of Syrian teams consisted of between four and six men, armed with some of the best Western and Soviet anti-tank weapons of the time, including RPG-7s, RPG-18s (disposable 64 mm antitank rocket launcher), AT-4 Spigot ATGMs (only early-production 9P135 units), and MILAN ATGMs from France. Usually there were two shooters and two loaders in each team. Every six-man team had two additional members equipped with SA-7 MANPADS. Syrian anti-tank troops were older, more experienced soldiers of the SA, showing strong military skills and determination, and were later described by the Israelis as having a very professional attitude towards their mission. They operated with predilection in urban areas, where narrow streets of Lebanese towns and villages could easily be turned into shooting galleries for Israeli tanks.

A FJB Commando analogue unit specialized in challenging the might of the Israeli armor. Equipped with AKM, Milan ATGM and SA-7 Strela MANPADS, these 10 men units are capable of holding off armor and airpower at a distance. Only constrained by the poor technology of the era available to them.

A Commando Batt '90 variant could feature Metis-M and Igla-1 as an LtRS analogue. Both were procured by the Syrian Army in the 90ies.

This capability is unseen yet ingame but in this case the historical record supports this mixture as well as the obvious asymmetrical response/desperation of the Syrian army to counter the Israeli horde.

Republican Guard (Syria)
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The Syrian Republican Guard (Arabic: الحرس الجمهوري‎ al-Haras al-Jamhūriyy as-Sūrī), also known as the Presidential Guard, is an elite 25,000 man mechanized division. Its main purpose is to protect the capital, Damascus, from any foreign or domestic threats. The Guard is the only Syrian military unit allowed within the capital city centre.

Could effectively serve as a higher veterancy mechanized infantry force.

14/15th Special Forces Division
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Syrians use the term 'Special Forces' to describe the 14th, 15th divisions, as well as the independent 'special forces' regiments, but they more closely resemble conventional light infantry units, than Western Special Forces in both mission and composition.

The term Special Forces has been applied ostensibly because of their specialized training in airborne and air assault operations, but they should be regarded as light infantry forces and elite only in relation to the conventional armored and mechanized brigades of the Syrian Army.

Should effectively serve as light infantry force, likely equipped with AKM, Metis & PKM.

Saraya ad-Difa
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The Defense Companies (Arabic: سرايا الدفاع‎; Saraya ad-Difa) were a paramilitary force in Syria that were commanded by Rifaat al-Assad. Their task was to defend the Assad regime, and Damascus, from internal and external attack. In 1984 they were merged into the Syrian Arab Army as the 4th Armoured division and the Republican Guard as well as the 14th Airborne Division comprising 5 Special Forces regiments.

Training, Doctrine and Uniform[edit]
Training consisted primarily of infantry training combined with Special Forces commando training modelled on the Soviet system. Recruits who passed this initial stage were given parachute training as well as advanced training either in airborne operations, artillery, Armour or Mechanized forces. Training for recruits usually was for 1 year whereas for officers it was for 2 years including a 4 month course at Soviet military academies. However, almost all Defense Companies personnel were qualified paratroopers as well as had to pass a basic course on familiarization with Tanks and Tank warfare. Tank training and doctrine was focused on using Tanks and Armoured formations in urban warfare environments, close-quarters combat, and deployment of Tank units alongside Airborne special forces used as shock troops. According to several Defense Company commanders, they developed their own military theories and doctrines, especially a new armoured doctrine in which the Tank itself was to substitute as a Commando soldier in close-quarters urban combat. The Tank was to be considered as an individual commando in an urban combat situation, and thus Tank training was very intensive and focused on attaining unimaginable feats with the Tank. This included engaging targets at less than 20 metres range, firing the main gun from within a building, and so on. These tactics were developed by Saraya officers during the Muslim brotherhood insurgency in Hama and Aleppo, and in Lebanon. This strategy was used extensively by successor units of the Saraya in the Syrian Civil War.

Might serve as a high mobility urban warfare squad similar to the E German Wachregiment. AMD 65/AKS-74U AR, RPG-18 or SPG-9RCL, RPD/RPK Could serve as a solid armament.

(Romanized arabic translations are approximate and require cleanup)

Almshah (line infantry) - AKM, RPG-7V, PKM
Al-Haras al-Jamhūriyy (Rep guard shock inf) - AKM, RPG-7VM, RPD
Al-Haras al-Jamhūriyy 90 (Rep guard shock inf) - AK-74M, RPG-7VR, RPK
20 Ktybh Al-Kwmandwz (20 commando batt, elite) - AKM, Milan ATGM, Strela-2 MANPADS
Saraya ad-Difa (shock urban, 15men) - AMD65, SPG-9 RCL, RPK
Al-Qwat Al-Khash (shock? light inf) - AKM, Metis, PKM
Frqh Qadf Al-lhb (flame team) - AKM, LPO-50 Flamethrower
Fryq Alsyad-Alqatl (Shock FIST) - AKM, RPG-7VL
Fryq Alsyad-Alqatl 90 (Shock FIST) - AKM, RPG-29
ATGM 78 - AKM, Milan ATGM
ATGM 84 - AKM, Konkurs ATGM
[*]ATGM 95 - AK-74M, Kornet-E ATGM
MANPADS - AKM, Strela-2
MANPADS 87 - AKM, Strela-3

INF Weapons:
AKM
AMD65 (AKMS like)
AKS-74U
[*]AK-74M

SVD (& copies)

RPD
RPK
PKM

AT Weapons Available:
Various Recoilless Rifles
RPG-7
RPG-7VM
The PG-7VM HEAT round was originally developed in the Soviet Union in 1969. An improved version of the earlier PG-7V HEAT round (the ‘M’ stands for Modernizirovanii, or ‘modernised’), the PG-7VM is capable of defeating 300mm of RHA whilst weighing in at 1.98kg, 270g less than it’s predecessor. It is 52mm longer than the PG-7V, and has a smooth, rather than fluted, nose cone. It is also a narrower design, with a diameter of 70mm, allowing for more projectiles to be carried in the ‘quiver’ type backpacks occasionally used to transport RPG rounds and making the projectile somewhat less susceptible to crosswinds. The range of the PG-7VM is comparable to the PG-7V at around 350m. The primary explosive compound is A-IX-1, a phlegmatised compound consisting of 96% RDX and 4% paraffin wax. The warhead is fuzed with the VP-7M PIBD fuze.

Slimmer warhead with slightly more pen than regular RPG-7. Likely +1-2PEN & 5-10%ACC

RPG-18
RPG-29
Milan 1978
Fagot
Konkurs 1984
Metis
[*]Metis-M 1998
[*]Kornet-E (1997)

AA Weapons
Strela-2 1970
Strela-3 1987
Igla-1
[*]Igla
[*]Igla-S

Vehicles:
BMP-1 (with and without ATGM) 1977
BMP-2 (with and without ATGM) 1987
BTR-50 1966

BTR-152 1956
BTR-60PB 1970
OT-64C SKOT 1977

Mi-4A 1958
Mi-8T 1971
Mi-25(D) Hind 1980

Logistics

Mi-6T 1972

Support

ZSU-23-4 1972
Strela-1 1975
Strela-10 1985
Osa 1979
Kub 1973
Buk 1986

[*]Pechora-2M
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[*]Tunguska
[*]Pantsir-S1
[*]Buk-M2E
[*]S-300

BM-24 1967
BM-21 Grad 1968
BM-27 Uragan 1987

2S1 122mm SPG 1982
2S3 152mm SPG 1982
2S4 240mm Mortar
T-34/D-30 SPG 1973
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130mm M-46 Motorized on Renault Kerax (1997)
Image

Tanks

T-34/55 1955 (modernized T-34 equivalent to in game units)
IS-3 1960
T-55A 1967
T-55AM
T-55 (NK) (North Korean upgrade of LRF & 14.5mm KPV as a cheaper alternative to Soviet T-55AM upgrade)
T-55AMV w/ Bastion ATGM

T-62 1973
T-62M 1982
[*]T-62MV (hypothetical as T-62s not upgraded much)

T-72 Ural 1979
T-72A 1982
T-72M1 1991
[*]T-72AV Syria was the only non Soviet state to acquire T-72A before its breakup. These were upgraded in early/mid 90s to the AV standard. Also ATGM capability added.
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Mikeboy wrote:According to Oryx blog in Syrian service the T-72 Ural was designated the T-79, the T-72A the T-82 (with no change in designation when upgraded to AV), and the T-72M1 the T-92.



Recon

Special Forces/Rapid Deployment Force/ Fa'uj
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10 man recon team

Fa'uj (shock recon) - AMD65, RPG-18 or RPG-7VM, SVD

various UAZs
BRDM-2 1969
BTR-40 1956
PT-76 1971
Shorland Mk.3/4 Armored Car
Mi-1 1957
Mi-2 1981
T-54 Recon 1957

Vehicles
BRDM Malyutka (1969)/Konkurs (1981)/ [*]Malyutka-2M (Upgraded Malyutka with tandem HEAT warhead and increased penetration - cost effective upgrade)
ZSU-57-2 1966
TO-55
UAZ mounted RR/ ATGMs
Ural w/ 57mm S-60 http://milinme.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/sft-001.jpg
Ural w/ 23mm ZU-23 1985?
Image
Air defense guns are valuable for suppressing ground targets. The IDF found that M163 Vulcan 20mm anti-aircraft guns were very useful in urban settings because the Vulcan has sufficiently high elevation to target the upper stories of buildings. Secondly, the Vulcan offered a high rate of fire which was very effective in suppressing snipers and intimidating opponents. These views of anti-aircraft weapons were shared by Israel’s opponents as well. As a result of earlier experiences in the Lebanese civil war, standard Syrian tactical doctrine called for employing an anti-aircraft section of ZU-23 23mm cannons with a tank battalion when operating in an urban environment. The Syrians concluded that ZU-23s have a “devastating effect” when employed against the outside walls because they “denude structures with their high rates of fire.” Similarly, the PLO also employed anti-aircraft guns in a ground-support role.

Su-100 1960
ISU-152 1966


Helicopters
SA.342 Gazelle with 4 HOT ATGM 1980 (used very effectively in 1982 war)
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Mi-25(D) Hind 1980

Syria also took delivery of French AS.12 missiles but cannot confirm any carrier for them so far. (typically Alouette-3 but Syria had none as far as im aware)

Airpower
The regional strength of the Syrian deck comes with the varied and strong Airpower, courtesy of rare Soviet aircraft additions. The Syrian air force is focused towards air combat and anti tank missions as dictated by its biggest opponent the IDF/IAF.

Air Superiority

Mig-23MS 1974
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2x R-13S IR AAM, 2x R-3R SARH AAM.

Mig-25P Interceptor 1979 (PD 1984)
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2x R-40R SARH AAMs, 2x R-40T IR AAM.

Mig-23ML 1982
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2x R-23R SARH AAM, 4x R-13M IR AAM.

Mig-23MLD 1983 (Peak Mig-23 model unavailable to Eastern Block)
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2x R-24R SARH AAM, 2x R-73 IR AAM.

MiG-29 9.12B 1987
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2x R-27R, 4x R-73 IR AAM (boring ususal) or unrealistic but edgy 2x R-27R, 2x R-27T

Anti-Tank

Mig-21MF 1973
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4x UB-16-57 Rocket Pod

Su-22M3/4 1983
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4x Kh-25ML

Mig-25RB Recon Bomber 1982
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4-10x RBK-500 Cluster
The MiG-25RB could originally carry four FAB-500M-62T 500 kilogram (1,100 pound) bombs, carried by tandem double ejector bomb racks under the fuselage. The bombs were specially built to tolerate high temperatures. Late production MiG-25RBs could carry six FAB-500 bombs under the fuselage, using tandem triple ejector bomb racks, and also featured a stores pylon under each wing, with each pylon capable of carrying two FAB-500 bombs in tandem. This gave a total bombload of ten FAB-500s, or four FAB-500s plus the big centerline fuel tank.


Su-24MK 1990
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4x Kh-25MT AGM (F&F)

Bomber

Su-22(M2D) 1979
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6x FAB-500

Multi-Role

Mig-21Bis 1983
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2x Kh-66 AGM. 4x R-60 IR AAM.

SEAD

Mig-23BN 1979/1981 (earliest missile delivery date)
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1x Kh-28E ARM, 2x R-60 IR AAM
The Kh-28 was exported to Iraq and Syria but it is not known whether either were able to successfully operate it.


Other

Il-28 Beagle 1965
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L-39Z Albatross
[*]Su-24M2
[*]Mig-29SMT 2007 (R-77, KAB-500/1500, Kh-35 ASHM, Kh-31ARM & ASHM ordered with Fulcrum)

Navy
Syria features a strong focus on coastal anti-ship defences, while Iraq features more offensive helicopter and aircraft based Exocet ASHM loadout. Overall a good mixture in Coalition (if Coalition based navies are ever implemented).


Mil Mi-14PL Helicopter 1984
Kamov Ka-28(27)PL Helicopter 1990

[*]Mig-29SMT ASuW 2007 (R-77, Kh-35 ASHM, Kh-31 ASHM ordered with Fulcrum)

Styz/Rubezh AntiShip Missile 1985
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SSC-1 Sepal/Shaddock Anti-Shipping Cruise Missiles (ASCM) 1987
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[*]C-802 ASHM 2010
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Komar missile boat 1963
Osa (Moskit) missile boat 1966

Petya-class frigate (2x2 76mm) 1975 (could serve as an inexpensive command frigate)
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Pr 773 Polnocny-C Landing (Supply?) Ships (could theoretically hold 4 ground units or 250 tons of supplies) 1983
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4x Strela-2 SAM, 2x AK-230 CIWS, 2x 140mm Orgon MLRS

Sonya class patrol boat/minesweeper 1985 (good escort vessels)
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2x AK-306 CIWS

Overall Syrias strengths appear to be in infantry AT, Air Defense as well as multi faceted and capable airforce. This is obvious in the face of its western neighbour. :? Its A2A deparment features Mig-23MLD, Mig-25PD & Mig-29 a solid lineup considering the likely decent availability bonus Syria would receive. In regards to ATGM choices Metis-M and/or Kornet-E would be controversial choices but not not unwarranted. Syrias close bond with the Soviet union, receiving numerous *restricted weapons such as T-72A, Uragan, Mig-25 and Su-24 would be logically extended towards their focus towards infantry AT power throughout 80s and 90s. Syrian AT teams proved their worth above Syrian tank forces in the 82 clashes and its proxy, Hezbollah exemplified their worth again with the Kornet in 2006 clashes with the IDF.

Coming next is Iraq... a much more diverse and interesting nation.
Last edited by icehawk308 on Mon 2 Feb 2015 00:56, edited 125 times in total.

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Re: [Non/Future-included nation] SYRIA & IRAQ

Postby Mikeboy » Tue 30 Dec 2014 07:23

I already did a basic list for Iraq, if it's any help:
viewtopic.php?f=189&t=45211&start=10#p591675

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Re: [Non/Future-included nation] SYRIA & IRAQ

Postby Mike » Tue 30 Dec 2014 09:21

You put T-34/55 instead of T-34/85. But damn that looks like a fun nation to play!
Image
Courtesy of KattiValk

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Re: [Non/Future-included nation] SYRIA & IRAQ

Postby icehawk308 » Tue 30 Dec 2014 17:47

Libya
Image

Libya is one of the founding members of the Federation of Arab Republics (FAR). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federation ... _Republics
Libya reminds of the Gulf states in its TOE. It utilizes petro dollars as a balance to its very limited arms industry to procure a wide selection of armaments. In terms of the Coalition, Libya brings strong and varied motorized forces, as well as diverse airforce and strong navy (for a minor). This mixes well with the stronger infantry and AD of Syria and the powerful support and aircraft selection of Iraq.

[*] Designates OTF/protos or later acquisition which can be included for timeline & balance reasons


Infantry

Revolutionary Guard Corps/ Jamahiriya Guard
The Revolutionary Guard Corps (Liwa Haris al-Jamahiriya) or Jamahiriya Guard was a Libyan paramilitary elite unit that played the role of key protection force of the government of Muammar Gaddafi, until his death in October 2011.[24] Composed of 3,000 men hand-picked from Gaddafi's tribal group in the Sirte region, the Guard was well armed, being provided with T-54 and T-62 tanks, APCs, MRLs, SA-8 and ZSU-23-4 SAMs taken from the army inventory. As of 2005, its commander was Hasan al-Kabir al-Gaddafi, a cousin of the former Libyan leader.

The Revolutionary Guard developed from the Revolutionary Committees, even if the latter had at first been introduced only into workplaces and communities, and not extended to the military. After the early 1980s, however, the Revolutionary Guard, as a paramilitary wing of the Revolutionary Committees, became entrenched within the armed forces. They served as a parallel channel of control, a means of ideological indoctrination in the barracks, and an apparatus for monitoring suspicious behavior.

Elite 15 SF unit equipped with AKS-74U or AK-74M, M79 Osa & RPK. Libyan Kommandosi 8-)

Pan-African Legion
In about 1980, Muammar Gaddafi introduced the Islamic Pan-African Legion, a body of mercenaries recruited primarily among dissidents from Sudan, Egypt, Tunisia, Mali, and Chad. West African states with Muslim populations have also been the source of some personnel. Believed to consist of about 7,000 individuals, the force has received training from experienced Palestinian and Syrian instructors. Some of those recruited to the legion were said to have been forcibly impressed from among nationals of neighboring countries who migrated to Libya in search of work.[citation needed]

According to the Military Balance published by the International Institute for Strategic Studies, the force was organized into one armored, one infantry, and one paratroop/commando brigade. It has been supplied with T-54 and T-55 tanks, armored personnel carriers, and EE-9 armored cars. The Islamic Pan-African Legion was reported to have been committed during the fighting in Chad in 1980 and was praised by Gaddafi for its success there. However, it was believed that many of the troops who fled the Chadian attacks of March 1987 were members of the Legion.

Mercenary light infantry team with AKM, B-10 RR, RPD/PKM.

People’s Militia
In 1987 the mission of the 45,000 People's Militia was territorial defence, and it was to function under the leadership of local military commanders. Gaddafi contended that it was the People's Militia that met the Egyptian incursions during the border clash of 1977, although the Egyptians insisted that their successful raids had been contested by regular army units. The militia forces are not known to have faced any other test that would permit an appraisal of their performance in home defence or as auxiliaries to the regular army. There was some evidence that local commanders had not responded energetically to their responsibility for training and supervising militia units. Militia units were reportedly generously equipped with arms, transport, and uniforms. In November 1985, it was announced that the first contingent of "armed people" trained as paratroopers had made a demonstration drop.

Militia unit with SKS & RPG-2 mounted on Saracen APCs?

Islamic Legion
The Islamic Legion (Arabic الفيلق الإسلامي al-Faylaq ul-'Islāmiyyu[1]) (aka Islamic Pan-African Legion) was a Libyan-sponsored pan-Arab paramilitary force, created in 1972. The Legion was part of Muammar Gaddafi's dream of creating the Great Islamic State of the Sahel.[2]

In an effort to realise Gaddafi's vision of a united Arab military force, plans for the creation of an Islamic Arab Legion were being announced from time to time. The goal, according to the Libyan press, would be to assemble an army of one million men and women fighters to prepare for the great Arab battle – “the battle of liberating Palestine, of toppling the reactionary regimes, of annihilating the borders, gates, and barriers between the countries of the Arab homeland, and of creating the single Arab Jamahiriya from the ocean to the gulf”. In March 1985, it was announced that the National Command of the Revolutionary Forces Command in the Arab Nation had been formed with Gaddafi at its head. A number of smaller radical Arab groups from Lebanon, Tunisia, Sudan, Iraq, the Persian Gulf states, and Jordan were represented at the inaugural meeting. Syrian Ba'ath Party and radical Palestinian factions were also present. Each of these movements was expected to earmark 10 per cent of its forces for service under the new command. As of April 1987, there was no information confirming the existence of such a militia.


(Romanized Arabic translations are approximate and require cleanup)
Overall a weak infantry line up but boosted by strong RR choices and powerful Jamahiriya Guard elite team.

Mylyshya Al-Nas (militia) - SKS or BM-59, RPG-2
Fryq Al-Mshah (line infantry) - AKM, RPG-7, PKM
Fryq Al-Mshah 90 (line infantry) - AKM, Carl Gustav RR, Zastava M84/PKM
Al-Faylaq Al-Efryqy (legion, light inf) - AKM, B-10 RR, PKM
Al-Faylaq Ul-'Islāmiyyu (islamic legion, 15men) - Skorpion SMG, RPG-7, RPD
Haris Al-Jamahiriya (elite guard, 15 men) - AKS-74U, M79 Osa, RPK
Fryq Ald'em (FIST) - Beretta M12 SMG, B-10 RR
Fryq Ald'em 90 (FIST) - AK-74M, SPG-9 RR (with PG-9VNT Tandem HEAT warhead, ++PEN)
MANPADS 75 - AKM, Strela-2
ATGM - AKM, Fagot ATGM
ATGM 90 - AKM, Konkurs ATGM

Weapons:
Skorpion SMG
Beretta M12 SMG
SKS
AKM
Beretta BM-59
[*]AK-74M/AK-100+

SVD/ Zastava M91

RPK
PKM

AT Weapons:
Vickers Vigilant ATGM 1966
Image
RPG-2
RPG-7
M79 Osa
various RR
Fagot ATGM
Konkurs ATGM
Carl Gustav RR 90+?

AA Weapons:
Strela-2 1973

Wheeled Transports:
Saracen 1961
OT-64C 1974
BTR-60 PB 1976
Chaimite APC 1978
Image
Type 6614 APC 1980
Image
EE-11 Urutu 1981

Tracked Transports:
OT-62A Topas 1971
BMP-1 1979
[*]BMP-3
http://www.libyaherald.com/wp-content/u ... LAna-.jpeg

Helicopter Transports:
CH-47C Chinook 1976
Image
Mi-8T 1976
Mi-24A 1978?
Image
Mi-24D 1979
Mi-2 Hoplite 1981 (purchased enough to serve in the transport role)


Logistics
CH-47C Chinook 1976
SA321 Super Frelon 1980
Image

Support
M-53/59 Praga 1970
Crotale 1973
Kub 1974
ZSU-23-4 1977
Strela-1 1979
Osa 1981
Strela-10 1984

AML-60 1971

M-51 130mm MRL 1975 (napalm?)
Image
BM-21 1976
RM-70 1981
2S1 1980
2S3 1980
Dana 152mm 1983
Palmaria 155 1982
Image

[*]NORA-B52 1984/2000s (design date/acquisition)
Image
The Nora B-52 is a 155 mm/52-calibre self-propelled howitzer, 4 generation artillery weapon system developed by Vojnotehnički Institut (Military Technical Institute Belgrade, Serbia) for export and domestic use. The first self-propelled Nora B(developed on basis of Nora C) was designed by MTI in 1984 (in that time no other country except SFRY had that kind of weapon today known with acronym TMG - Truck Mounted Gun) with a modified 152 mm towed gun-howitzer NORA M84 [1] with 45 caliber gun mounted on an FAP 8x8 truck bed and was 3 generation of artillery weapons.


Tanks
Centurion mk3 1956
T-34/85 1970

T-55 1970
T-55A 1976

T-62 1974
T-62 Obr 75 1978

T-72 1979
T-72M1 1982
M-84A 1991
Image
Libya ordered ~200 M-84 MBTs from Yugoslavia, which were manufactured but not delivered due to the outbreak of war in Yugoslavia. 

The basic tank has a cast steel turrent with maximal thickness of 410mm, later in the M-84A version a segment out of a non-metal, most likely granit of quartz was sandwiched between layers of steel. The glacis uses laminate armor, glass in plastic resin between two steel plates, in the A version an 16mm steel plate was welded on the glacis. Total armor protection ranges between 550mm-650mm for the glacis and 560mm-700mm for the turret. During the wars in Yugoslavia the M-84's frontal armor proved very effective against any type of AT threat. Side or rear hits often result in a catastrophic catastrophic ammo explosion.


Recon
Excellent optics of Rasit radar in Cat C as well as Type 6616 allow Lybia to be an effective scout force.

OH-58 1974
Mi-2 1978
Type 6616 Recon 1981
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If required a 106 mm M40-type recoilless rifle can be mounted forward of the commander's position on the turret roof.

20mm AC + 106mm RR

BRDM-2 1978
Recon jeeps
T-55 Recon
Rasit Radar 1980
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Vehicles
EE-9 Cascavel 1975
Image
AML-90 1971
Saladin 1960
Ferret Vigilant 1966
Image
BRDM Malyutka 1980

various RR & ATGM jeeps. (SS.11, Fagot, M40, B-11)

Helicopters
Alouette 3 AT 1975
Image
Mi-24A 1978?
Image
Mi-24D 1979
Mi-24V 1980

Airforce

Air Superiority

Mig-21PF 1975
2x K-5M SARH AAM

Mig-23MS 1976
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4x R-13S IR AAM

Mirage F1ED, 1979
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2x R-530 SARH AAM, 2x R550 Magic IR AAM.

Mig-25P 1979
Image
4x R-40T IR AAM

Anti-Tank

Mirage F1AD 1978
Image
8× Matra rocket pods w/ 18× SNEB 68 mm rockets ea

Su-22M3 1980
Image
2x Kh-23M

Su-24MK 1989
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2-3x Kh-29T AGM (F&F)

Bomber

Mig-25RB 1978
Image
4-10 ZB-500 Napalm (RBK on Syrian RBs, & FABs on Iraqi variants)

Tu-22 Blinder 1976
Image
12-24x FAB-500 8-)

Multi Role

Mig-21bis 1978
Image
2x S-24 Rocket, 4x R-60 IR AAM.

Mirage 5DE 1971
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2x 400g Bomb, 2x R550 Magic IR AAM

Other

Mig23BN 1975

F-5A 1968
J-21 Jastreb 1976
L-39Z Albatross 1978

Navy
Varied green water naval force with helicopter support.

SA 321GM Super Frelon w/2x Exocet ASHM 1981
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Mi-14PL 1982

Rubezh ASHM 1985

Brave class patrol ships 1966
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2x 40mm Bofors

SUSA class fast attack craft (missile) 1967
Image
8x SS-12 ASHM, 2x 40mm AC

Libyan frigate Dat Assawari 1973
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4x Otomat ASHM, 1x 114mm 4.5in gun, 2x Seacat SAM, 2x 40mm Bofors AA, 2x 35mm Oerlikon CIWS

Osa class missile boat 1976
Nauchka missile corvette 1981

BEIR GRASSA class fast attack craft (missile) 1979
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1x 76mm gun, 4x Otomat Mk1 ASHM, , 2x 40mm/70 Breda Bofors

Al I'sar (Ras el Gelais/Natya) class fleet minesweepers/patrol ships 1981 (inexpensive command ship)
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2x AK-230 CIWS, 2x2 25mm AC,

Al Hani (Koni) class light frigates 1986
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4x Styx ASHM, 2x2 76mm gun, 1x Osa-M Naval SAM, 2x AK-630 CIWS

Pr 773 Polnocny-C Landing (Supply?) Ships (could theoretically hold 4 ground units or 250 tons of supplies) 1979
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4x Strela-2 SAM, 2x AK-230 CIWS, 2x 140mm Orgon MLRS
Last edited by icehawk308 on Thu 22 Jan 2015 03:41, edited 6 times in total.

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icehawk308
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Re: [Non/Future-included nation] SYRIA & IRAQ

Postby icehawk308 » Tue 30 Dec 2014 21:07

Iraq
Iraq's arsenal has no real match. China with some foreign purchases would be the closest candidate. Principally based on Soviet equipment, its included some French arsenal into its fold as well as Brasilian, and Eastern European vehicles as well as Chinese weapons. Its arsenal is quite balanced, with its support section blistering with excellent artillery and rocket systems. Transport options for infantry are also very diverse, including the possibility of using western helicopters in a cost effective fashion. Airpower is quite strong and reminiscent of Syria's with Mig-25 and Su-24 being utilized. Additionally the Su-25 makes an appearance.

Overall the Iraqi deck offers flavor as well as unit variety. Strong principally in support as well as air assets, it would mix rather well with Syria's focus on more powerful infantry and air defence aspects.

Infantry

Republican Guard (Iraq)
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The Iraqi Republican Guard (Arabic: حرس العراقي الجمهوري‎ ""Ḥaris al-‘Irāq al-Jamhūriyy") was a branch of the Iraqi military from 1969 to 2003, primarily during the presidency of Saddam Hussein. It later became the Republican Guard Corps, and then the Republican Guard Forces Command (RGFC) with its expansion into two corps. The Republican Guard was disbanded in 2003, after the invasion of Iraq by a U.S.-led international coalition.

The Republican Guard were the elite troops of the Iraqi army directly reporting to Saddam Hussein, unlike the paramilitary force Fedayeen Saddam, and the ordinary Iraqi Army. They were easily recognizable by their red or Maroon berets, rather than the ordinary black of the Iraqi Army. Guard members were mainly, but not exclusively, Sunni Arabs rather than Shi'a Arabs, or Sunni Kurds. They were better trained, disciplined, equipped, and paid than ordinary Iraqi soldiers, receiving bonuses, new cars, and subsidized housing.


Likely higher veterancy mechanized infantry force.

Al Jaysh al Sha'abi, People's Militia
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The Iraqi Popular Army also known as the People's Army or People's Militia (Arabic: الجيش الشعبي Al Jaysh ash Shaabi) was a paramilitary agency composed of civilian volunteers to protect the Ba'ath regime against (a) internal opposition and (b) to serve as a counterbalance against any coup attempt by the regular Iraqi Army.

In 1987, the People's Army, standing at an estimated 650,000, approached the regular armed forces' manpower strength.


Can serve as a reservist force equipped with AK-47/SKS & RPG-2 or M80 Zolja (M72 LAW copy)

8th As Saiqa Special Forces Division
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contained a marine brigade, a parachute brigade, and a special forces brigade. The marine brigade was deployed on Kuwait's nine islands, all of which with the exception of Failaka Island are uninhabited. The brigade was headquartered on Bubiyan Island

Represents airborne and marine assets.

(Romanized arabic translations are approximate and would require cleanup)
Simple but efficient infantry grouping. As Saiqa serves as dual marine/para force, could have 1 extra card or 15men team?. Varied MANPADS choices.


Al Jaysh al Sha'abi (militia) - AK-47, RPG-2
Frqh Al-ramy (line infantry) - AKM, M80 Zolja, PKM
Frqh Al-ramy 85 (line infantry) - AKM, RPG-7VL, Type 67 MG
Ḥaris al-‘Irāq al-Jamhūriyy (Rep Guard shock inf) - Zastava M-70, M79 Osa, RPD
As Saiqa Al-Qwat Al-Khash (elite marine/para, 15men?) - AKS-74U, APILAS, RPK
Qadf Al-lhb (flame team) - AKM, Type 74 Flamethrower
FIST - AKM, SPG-9
ATGM - AKM, Milan ATGM
MANPADS - AKM, Strela-2
MANPADS 85 - AKM, HN-5A
MANPADS 90 - AKM, Igla-1E

Weapons:
PM-63 SMG
Skorpion SMG
SKS
AKM (& various copies)
AKS-74U

SVD (& various copies)
Zastava M76/ Tabuk Sniper Rifle

RPD
RPK
PKM

AT Weapons available:
SPG-9
RPG-7
M79 Osa
M80 Zolja
Fagot
Milan 1975
[*]RPG-29
[*]Kornet-E

AA Weapons:
Strela-2 1975
Strela-3 1987
Igla-1E 1989
HN-5A 1986

Vehicles:

BTR-152
BTR-60PB 1971
OT-64C 1981
D-944 PSzH-IV 1981
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Fahd
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Panhard M3 1970
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EE-11 Urutu 1980 (marines)
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BTR-50 1969/ OT-62A 1968

OT-62 w/ ZU-23mm 1985+ (marines)
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Type 63 APC 1982
AMX-10P 1981
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MT-LB 1983
MT-LB ZU-23 1983+
Image
Image

BMP-1 1974
BMD-1 1981
BMP-2 1987

BMP-1 Saddam with appliqué armor 1989 (proto)
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[*]For variety can also be equipped with an upgraded 9M14-2 Malyutka-2 ATGM (800mm RHA/ 20 PEN, ioc 1992)

Mil Mi-4A Hound-A 1964
Mil Mi-8T Hip-C 1971
Mil Mi-25(D) Hind 1979
Mil Mi-8TV Hip-F 1984
Mil Mi-17 Hip-H 1986
Bell214ST 1987
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SA330 Puma (1976 VIP, 1980 transport)

Logistics

AMX-10/VFA CP 1981
YW-701 CP 1982

Mil Mi-6T Hook-A 1973

Support:

M53/59 Praga
ZSU-23-4 1973

BTR-50 w/ 2x37mm Type 65/74 AC
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Strela-1 1982
Strela-10 1985
Osa 1982
Roland 2 (Tracked 1985, Wheeled 1982)
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Image
Iraq is believed to have received 100 shelter-mounted Roland 2 on MAN 8×8 trucks and 13 self-propelled systems on the AMX-30R chassis during the 1980–88


Kub 1977

[*]Kub-IR (passive version)
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Xeno426 wrote:[spoiler=Iraq]Kub-IR: These things are weird. They couldn't have had terribly long range, since the IR nose seems to have been basically taken from R-60 missiles. The regular KUB missiles is command guided, so presumably these missiles would only be able to home in to IR in the terminal stages. Thus this weapon would likely be IR, but still not [F&F].


[*]Pechora-2 (mobile, extended range version?)
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Iraq has deployed a new mobile anti-aircraft battery using a new mobile launcher.

Regarding the missile activity, the Iraqis used booster rockets from two-stage Russian-made SA-2 missiles and attached them to SA-3 missiles in an effort to increase the latter's range, the officials said.
Iraq's SA-2 missiles have a maximum range of about 21 miles, and its SA-3s can hit targets up to 15 miles away. Both systems were first deployed in the late 1950s.


2S1 122mm SPG 1980
2S3 152mm SPG 1980
GCT F1 155mm SPG 1983
M-1978 (Koksan) 170mm LR SPG
Al-Fao 210mm LR SPG (Proto) 1989
Majnoon 155mm SPG (Proto) 1989
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130mm M-46 on T-54
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Panhard AML-60 60mm Mortar Armoured Car 1967

MT-LB w/ 2B9 Vasiliek Auto mortar 80s?
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MT-LB 120mm SP Mortar 83+?
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MT-LB SM4; 4 Tube 120mm Mortar 1989
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T-54 with 160mm Mortar
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BM-21 1968
180 mm ASTROS SS-30 1984
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300 mm ASTROS SS-60 (Cluster) 1986-88
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262 mm M-87 "Orkan"/ Ababeel 50 1988
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Features
Unique features at the time of introduction (1987) when compared to other MRLs operational at the time include:

Ability to disperse anti-tank or anti-personnel mines up to 50 km from the firing location.
Semi-automatic loading.
Loading was semi-automatic from the vehicle with reserve rockets. Rockets were carried by crane and lowered onto the loading device after which the rocket was automatically loaded in barrel.

Preparations to fire take two minutes.
Automatic leveling. Automatic Leveling of weapon was very precise. The system has a TV camera corrector for correcting missile path.
The system for automatic levelling would record I,II and III fired missile paths then navigate the barrels as needed.

Automatic barrel sight.
Hard chromed barrels without the need for cleaning.
Mines KB-2 with wings and parachutes with two fuses (magnetic and for self-destruction after 24 hours)


Tanks

M-24 Chaffee 1956
T-34/85 1959
IS-3 1959

T-55A (1974)/ Type 59 (1982)/ Type 69 (1983)
T-55/Type59/69 Enigma
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T-55, Type 59, and Type 69 tanks used by Iraqi Brigade commanders had appliqué armour on turrets and hulls composed of several layers of spaced armour (the technique of choice for the Iraqi Engineers) plates enclosed in steel boxes. It was successful at defeating shaped charge warheads during the battle of Khafji, where one unit is reported to have survived several hits from MILAN missiles before being dispatched by a helicopter.


T-55/Type59/69 QM
T-55 armed with NATO-standard 105 mm L7 or M68 gun instead of the old 100 mm gun. The tank was fitted with a French laser range-finder. The upgrades were done in mid-to-late 1980s.


T-55/Type59/69 QM2
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T-55 upgraded by Soviet technicians with a Soviet 125 mm/L52 smoothbore gun and French laser range-finder, 1986-1991.


T-62 1974
T-62 Obr75 1982
[*]T-62MV (hypothetical, due to large numbers available to upgrade)
Image
100 were ordered in 1973 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1974 and 1975. 600 ordered in 1976 from the Soviet Union were delivered between 1977 and 1979 (the vehicles were probably produced in Czechoslovakia). 2,150 were ordered in 1982 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1982 and 1989 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). 1,500 were in service in 1990, 500 in 1995, 2000 and 2002. More than 1,000 were in service before the First Persian Gulf War.

The most extensive employment of the T-62 tanks after the 1973 war was the conflict between Iraq and Iran. Iraq had acquired the worlds largest T-62 inventory in the 1970s and this type made up much of the tank force during the conflict.


T-72 1979
T-72M1 1982
Assad Babil - home produced variant of the T-72M with minor armor changes
Despite the relative thinness, a retrofitted reinforced armor plate present both at the turret and the front upper hull seems to have been relatively effective against some shaped-charge ordnance, like the TOWs and Hellfire missiles. There are reports of Iraqi T-72s surviving near-misses from these weapons, although the reinforced armor generally did not prevent a mobility kill. However, it is also possible that the unexpected survival rate was due to the electro-optical countermeasures mounted on most of the tanks rather than the added armor.[13][14][15][16]

There is evidence of at least one Lion surviving a direct hit from an Abrams main gun in Mahmoudiyah in 2003. A 120 mm HEAT round from an Abrams impacted on the front of an Asad Babil turret at point blank range without producing a catastrophic kill.[17] Some Lion tanks may have featured explosive reactive armor, possibly obtained from Polish T-72M1 spare parts.[18]

Another improvised armor upgrade that may have also been added at the Taji complex.[2] An additional 30 mm armor plate was welded on the front areas of the hull and turret, leaving an air gap matching the size of the armor, so that the power of a HEAT jet could be dissipated in the hollow space. This technique follows the principle of spaced armor. The Iraqi engineers tested this reinforcement against captured Iranian 120 mm Chieftain tank guns in 1989, apparently with some success.

[*]T-72V - variants equipped with indigenous/ Kontakt1 ERA
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Recon

Iraqi Special Forces/Commando Units
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As such beyond 5/man recon team Iraqi SOF forces should be few and far between. Syria as part of the coalition provides the bulk of the specialist units.

Al'Eraq Al-Mghwar - PM-63 SMG, M80 Zolja , M76/Tobuk Sniper Rifle

Engesa EE-3 Jararaca Reconnaissance Vehicle 1984
BRDM-2 Reconnaissance Vehicle 1967
BRDM-2 w/23mm AC
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UAZ recon type
PT-76 1968

SA 316 Alouette III 1971
Mi-2 1984

RASIT Radar 1985 (likely vehicle mounted)
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Vehicles
Panhard ERC-90 Sagaie Armoured Car 1980
Panhard AML-90 Armoured Car 1967
Engesa EE-9 Cascavel Armoured Car 1979
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Panhard VCR/TH HOT ATGM 1979
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BRDM-2 Malyutka (1973)/ Konkurs
Various UAZ RR & ATGM platforms
SU-100 1959
ZSU-57-2 1971

MT-LB Flamethrower
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OT-62 90mm FSV
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Helicopters

SA 316B Alouette III w/ 4x SS.11 ATGM 1975
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MD500 Defender 1982 (civilian conversion, 2x rocket pod?)
MD-530MG Defender 1985 (civilian conversion, 2x 23mm Gunpod?)

Bo-105P 1979
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Gazelle w/ HOT ATGM 1978
During the Iran–Iraq War fought throughout most of the 1980s, a significant amount of French-built military equipment was purchased by Iraq, including a fleet of 40, HOT-armed Gazelles.[40] Iraq reportedly received roughly 100 Gazelle helicopters. The Gazelle was commonly used in conjunction with Russian-built Mil Mi-24 Hind gunships, and were frequently used in counterattacks against Iranian forces. By 2000, following significant equipment losses resulting from the 1991 Gulf War, Iraq reportedly had only 20 Gazelles left in its inventory.


Mi-25 Hind 1979
Mi-25 AA? 1980s
The Iraqis were early foreign operators of the Hind, obtaining them beginning in the late 1970s. It is unclear how many Hinds were purchased by Iraq, but the number was apparently about 60. Iraqi Hinds saw particularly heavy action during the Iran-Iraq War of 1980:1988. The gunships were used extensively for ground attack on Iranian troops, inflicting great slaughter and acquiring a fearsome reputation. They were also the first helicopters to engage in serious air-to-air combat with other helicopters, in the form of Iranian AH-1J SeaCobra gunships.

The Hind had been more or less inspired by the American Bell Cobra and Hind crews regarded the Cobra as their natural enemy. Although the Hind was faster and tougher, the Cobra was more agile. Soviet evaluations had demonstrated that in a contest between two helicopters the one that could turn more tightly was likely to win.

According to a story, the Cobra's advantage in maneuverability over the Hind had been demonstrated in the early 1980s. A Soviet Hind based in East Germany was flying along the border with West Germany, playing "cat" to a US Army Cobra flying on the other side of the border in the role of "mouse". The Cobra pilot was a "real pro", and the Hind pilot lost control trying to follow his maneuvers. The Soviet gunship went into the ground, killing its crew. This "kill" could be chalked up more to the Soviet pilot's fatal lack of judgement than to the American pilot's skill, and in fact the Iraqis demonstrated that the contest between Hind and Cobra was far from one-sided.

It might not have seemed so at first. In November 1980, not long after the beginning of the war with Iraq's invasion of Iran on 22 September 1980, two Iranian SeaCobras crept up on two Hinds and hit them with TOW wire-guided antitank missiles. One Hind went down immediately, the other was badly damaged and crashed before reaching base. The Iranians pulled off a repeat performance on 24 April 1981, destroying two Hinds without loss to themselves.

Then the Iraqis hit back, claiming the destruction of a SeaCobra on 14 September 1983; three SeaCobras on 5 February 1984; and three more on 25 February 1984. Things went quiet for a time, and then on 13 February 1986 each side lost a gunship. A few days later, on 16 February, a Hind shot down a SeaCobra, with a SeaCobra claiming a Hind in return on 18 February. The last engagement between the two types was on 22 May 1986, when the Hinds shot down a SeaCobra.

The score in the end was 10 kills on SeaCobras and 6 kills on Hinds. The relatively small numbers and the inevitable disputes over actual kill numbers makes it unclear if one gunship had a real technical superiority over the other. It appears that the outcome of the fights was dependent more on the tactical situation and pilot skill than the inherent merits of each machine. Iraqi Hinds also claimed a total of 43 kills against other Iranian helicopters, such as Agusta-Bell Hueys. One Hind even shot down an Iranian McDonnell F-4D Phantom jet fighter on 26 October 1982, though different sources give conflicting details of the incident.

Air-to-air missiles were tested on the Mi-24 during the 1970s (Strela) and the late 1980s (R-60 and R-73). From the end of the 1970s, the modified version of this missile was used to arm Mi-24 (HIND E) attack helictopters, especially for a counter-helictopter role.

A good case can be made for a sub variant mounting Strela -3 or R-60 missiles in an anti-Cobra fashion 8-)

Mil Mi-25 "Naja Sayyad" (Cobra Hunter) w/ 4 R-60M or 8x Strela-3 (4 pylons of x2) & 4x Kokon ATGM 1983 8-)

[*]Mi-24VM/35M Hind 2013 (could be moved up in alternate timeline)
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16x Kokon-M or Ataka ATGM 8-)


Airforce
Iraqi Air force is focused towards strong A2A, bomber, SEAD and anti-ship missions due to its focus on fighting infantry based opponent with solid A2A fighter force (F-4s, F-14s) during the Iraq-Iran war. Integration of Mirage F1s aids in diversity providing strong choices in air combat as well as effective anti ship strikers.

Air Superiority

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21MF Fishbed-J 1973
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2x R-3R SARH AAM, 4x R-60 IR AAM.

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-23MF Flogger-B 1980?
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2x R-23T IR AAM, 4x R-60 IR AAM.

Mirage F1EQ-2 1981
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2x Super 530F SARH AAM, 2x Matra R550 Magic IR AAM

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25PD Foxbat-A 1984
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2x R-40RD SARH AAM, 4x R-60M IR AAM

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-29 9.12B Fulcrum 1986
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2x R-27R SARH AAM or 2x R-73 IR AAM, 4x R-60M IR AAM (regular interceptor or knife fighter loadout)

Anti-Tank

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-23BN Flogger-H 1984
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2x Kh-29L AGM
The Iraqis obtained 80 and fitted some of them with fixed, nose-mounted midair refueling probes -- like those on Iraqi Dassault Mirage F1 fighters, possibly using the same hardware -- for long-range strikes during the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s. The Iraqis even fitted the French ATLIS laser targeting pod to their MiG-23BNs to guide the Kh-29L (NATO AS-14 "Kedge") laser-guided ASM.


Mirage F1EQ-5 1986 (delivery of aircraft/AS-30L)
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2x AS-30L AGM or 2x LGB, 2x Matra Magic IR AAM

Sukhoi Su-22M3 1986
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4-6x RBK-500 Cluster

Sukhoi Su-25K Frogfoot-A 1986
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8x S-25 Rocket

Bomber

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25RB Foxbat-B 1982
Image
4-10x FAB-500
The MiG-25RB could originally carry four FAB-500M-62T 500 kilogram (1,100 pound) bombs, carried by tandem double ejector bomb racks under the fuselage. The bombs were specially built to tolerate high temperatures. Late production MiG-25RBs could carry six FAB-500 bombs under the fuselage, using tandem triple ejector bomb racks, and also featured a stores pylon under each wing, with each pylon capable of carrying two FAB-500 bombs in tandem. This gave a total bombload of ten FAB-500s, or four FAB-500s plus the big centerline fuel tank.


Sukhoi Su-20 Fitter 1974
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4-8x ZB500 Napalm

Sukhoi Su-24MK Fencer-D 1989
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30x FAB-250 or 6x B-13L rocket pods (30x 122mm rockets)

Tu-22 Blinder 1973
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1x FAB-9000 :shock: :o :twisted:
The Iraqi Air Force were particularly enthusiastic users of the gargantuan FAB-9000 general-purpose bomb, which skilled Tu-22 pilots could deploy with impressive accuracy, utilizing supersonic toss bombing techniques at stand-off distances and allowing the aircraft to escape retaliatory anti-aircraft fire. Usage of the FAB-9000 was so heavy that the Iraqis ran low of imported Soviet stocks and resorted to manufacturing their own version, called the Nassir-9.

Outsized for wargame however in wingspan/range it equals F111 (if not weight, being an iron beast). Also adored by the IrAF and used in battlefield support in large sortie numbers. 0 ECM but fast (900kph) and due to size, high HP (15-20).

Multi Role

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-23MS Flogger-E 1976
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2x R-3S IR AAM, 2x UB-57 Rocket Pod

SEAD

Sukhoi Su-22M-4 Fitter-K 1983 (missile)
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1x Kh-28 ARM

Mrage F1EQ-4 1984/86 (aircraft/missile delivery)
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1x ARMAT ARM, 2x Matra Magic IR AAM

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25BM 1986 (proto)
Image
In 1986, 1987, and 1988 the Soviets deployed several MiG-25BMs to Iraq for testing purposes. Between others, these also used the Kh-58U and Kh-25MP anti-radar-missiles in combat. At least two were lost in clashes with Iranian F-14A Tomcats (Soviet/Russian sources tell no one MiG-25's was shot down by F-14A) - to a considerable disgrace and disappointment of the Soviets.

Aside from MiG-25RBs, and MiG-25PDS', in 1986 the Soviets for the first time deployed also their MiG-25BMs to Iraq. Not much is known about the first such "test expedition", but that it was brought to a sudden end when one of the aircraft was shot down by an Iranian F-14. The same happened during the next such test, undertaken in November 1987, with the difference that that time the MiG was "only" damaged, which caused it to crash-land in Iraq. The MiG-25BMs were deployed to Iraq one final time in May and June 1988, in order to test Kh-58U and even Kh-31P anti-radar-missiles.

2x Kh-58U or Kh-31P ARM, 4x R-60M IR AAM

Other

Il-28 Beagle 1958
Chengdu F-7B 1983
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Shenyang F-6A 1982
Sukhoi Su-7B Fitter-A
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Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21bis Fishbed-N 1983
Image

Navy
More offensive minded than Syrias with aircraft anti-ship strikers as well missile corvettes. Interestingly the majority of the units are from France and Italy providing even more REDFOR variety.

HY-2G Silkworm ASHM Battery 1988 (equivalent to Rubezh Styx coastal system)
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SA 316 Alouette III w/ 2x AS.12 Light ASHM 1975
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SA 321 Super Frelon - Anti Ship (2x Exocet ASHM) 1981 (chopper and missile)
Image

Mirage F1EQ5/6 1986/88
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1x Exocet ASHM, 2x Matra R550 Magic IR AAM

Super Entendard 1983
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1x Exocet ASHM

Mig-23ML AsuW 83+?
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1x Exocet ASHM, 2x R-24R SARH AAM

Komar missile boat 1972
Osa (Moskit) missile boat 1972

Pr 773 Atika/Polnocny-C Landing (Supply?) Ships (could theoretically hold 4 ground units or 250 tons of supplies) 1977
Image
4x Strela-2 SAM, 2x AK-230 CIWS, 2x 140mm Orgon MLRS

Nestin-class river minesweeper/ patrol boat. 1976+?
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2x quad 20mm Hispano AC, Strela-2M MANPADS

[*]Lupo class frigate (not delivered due to sanctions) 1991
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1x Oto Merala 127mm, 8x Sea Sparrow/Aspide SAM, 8x Otomat Mk2 ASHM, 2x Twin 40mm CIWS

[*]Assad class corvette (not delivered due to sanctions) 1991
Image
1x Otobreda 76mm, 6x Otomat ASHM, 1x4 Aspide SAM, 1x Breda Daro Twin 40mm CIWS/AAA


Navy Other
Potentially out of scale but included for reference.

Tu-22 Blinder 1973/84 (aircraft/ missile delivery date)
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1x AS-4 Kitchen or AS-6 Kingfish ASHM (Moskit equivalent)
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https://books.google.ca/books?id=dk2YEn ... aq&f=false
Iraqi Tu-22s were also deployed in the last stages of the "Tanker War". On 19 March 1988, four Tu-22s together with six Mirage F.1s carried out a raid against Iranian operated oil tankers near Kharg Island, with the Tu-22s sinking one supertanker and setting another on fire, while Exocet missiles from the Mirages damaged another tanker. A second strike against Kharg Island later the same day was less successful, encountering alerted Iranian defences, with two Tu-22s being shot down together with several other Iraqi aircraft. These were the final operations carried out by Iraq's Tu-22s during the Iran–Iraq war, with total Iraqi losses during the war being seven Tu-22s, with several more badly damaged.

The Iraqis were already doing their best to bring the shattered and weakened IrAF back into the war, and despite their “neutral” stance regarding hostilities between Baghdad and Tehran, the Soviets decided to become more active in supporting Iraq. After negotiations between Moscow and Baghdad, in May 1981 two Tu-22K/KPs taken from the Soviet Strategic Air Force (Dalnaya Aviatsiya), together with 200 Kh-22 (AS-4 Kitchen) missiles, ten Soviet aircraft weapons operators specialized in Tu-22Ks and Kh-22s, and nearly 100 weapons technicians needed to maintain the missiles and aircraft, were deployed to Iraq. First the Soviets set about getting as many Iraqi Tu-22s operational as possible, refurbishing them completely one by one, as well as rebuilding the example badly damaged by an engine fire before the war. In addition, the Soviets helped to train Iraqis to use the Tu-22Bs and Tu-22K/KPs properly, and monitored the testing of the Kh-22s under combat conditions. From than on, and for a considerable period of time, a Soviet officer flew on board Iraqi Tu-22s on every mission.


B-6D (H-6D) 1988
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2x SY-1A ASHM (Styx equivalent)
Last edited by icehawk308 on Wed 4 Feb 2015 21:45, edited 32 times in total.

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Killertomato
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Re: [Non/Future-included nation] SYRIA & IRAQ

Postby Killertomato » Tue 30 Dec 2014 21:12

Ol' Saddam had so much gear back in '91.

Too bad for him it didn't help any.
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Re: [Non/Future-included nation] SYRIA & IRAQ

Postby panzersaurkrautwefer » Tue 30 Dec 2014 21:14

There is evidence of at least one Lion surviving a direct hit from an Abrams main gun in Mahmoudiyah in 2003. A 120 mm HEAT round from an Abrams impacted on the front of an Asad Babil turret at point blank range without producing a catastrophic kill.


Good post. I just found this portion sort of funny in the sense that "the vehicle wasn't abjectly destroyed in all ways!" was taken to mean survive.
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Re: [Non/Future-included nation] SYRIA & IRAQ

Postby Vulcan 607 » Tue 30 Dec 2014 21:15

Iraq operated the Hunter for a while.

Non of these are any match for the.
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Re: [Non/Future-included nation] SYRIA & IRAQ

Postby SKLKNKR » Tue 30 Dec 2014 21:27

Next wargame should be ME. Seriously, you get a bunch of pretty similar nations with no realistic Red/Blu bias.
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Re: [Non/Future-included nation] SYRIA & IRAQ

Postby Vulcan 607 » Tue 30 Dec 2014 21:33

SKLKNKR wrote:Next wargame should be ME. Seriously, you get a bunch of pretty similar nations with no realistic Red/Blu bias.


Middle east and Africa with Africa we can get Cuban forces

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