Future DLC’s for Wargame Red Dragon

QFW
Private
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue 23 Oct 2018 18:19
Contact:

Re: Future DLC’s for Wargame Red Dragon

Postby QFW » Wed 24 Oct 2018 15:04

I do think the idea of a SEA DLC works, but only if there were a campaign included. Unfortunately, most SEA countries with the exception of Thailand, Singapore and Vietnam are not viable as standalone because a lot of key capabilities were not developed in the '80s and '90s, with most others being essentially counter-insurgency/internal security forces.

So this is my first post, and a little campaign scenario off the top of my head (apologies if done somewhere before!)

Year: 1991

Two campaigns centred around the same conflict.

The Republic of Singapore versus the Federated States of Malaysia and the Republic of Indonesia

Scenario:

Spoiler : :
In 1990, Lee Kuan Yew steps down as Prime Minister of the small island nation of Singapore, to be replaced by his successor, Goh Chok Tong. On 9th August 1991, Singapore's National Day, Malaysia and Indonesia conduct a joint airborne/combined arms exercise. Both nations aimed artillery at Singapore's national parade grounds and landed airborne troops within kilometres of her borders. In response, the island Republic conducted the largest and most rapid open mobilisation of reserve troops in her short history. As Malaysian and Singaporean troops face off across the border, a stray shot precipitate a series of misunderstandings that trigger open conflict.


The map consists of Peninsular Malaysia south of Perak and the Riau/Batam portion of Sumatra, with copious naval sectors.

Factions:

1. Malindo
2. Singapore

Frankly though, all three nations ought to be BLUFOR for multiplayer purposes (unless we pull a
Finland and give some of the three to REDFOR), while Malaysia and Singapore ought to be part of the Commonwealth. Singapore as far as I am aware can function as a standalone nation, albeit with shortages in heavy armour (or not!).

Malindo Campaign:
"Operasi Darsasa 3AB"

Scenario in spoiler.
Spoiler : :
Elite Malaysian and Indonesian infantry, artillery and aviation regiments are massed in Johor
(2 sectors) and Batam (1 sector). These have high morale and are well- equipped.
The player is frantically apprized of the sudden northward
push of a huge mass of Singaporean armoured battalions and infantry brigades, which are well-
equipped with plenty of air support and have good morale. Reinforcements
of Malaysian regulars are delayed due to superior enemy airpower, leaving only a few territorial
units on the strategic map. The player will be attacked in Johor on Turn 0, and is tipped to lose
the first few sectors, which only have airborne infantry and artillery, with limited vehicular support.
The challenge is to initially cause enough casualties to the enemy to halt the advance, with an almost
inevitable fighting retreat being the main feature of this campaign. Eventually, Singapore's reserve
units which are well-equipped but have low morale start supplanting the initial invasion forces,
with amphibious landings and naval reinforcements of heavy armour, airpower and rotary wing
aviation. Indonesia attempts landings in Batam, tying up Singapore's reserve units depending on how
well battles are fought in the naval sectors, and whether they can actually land in Singapore.
The player must take back all of Malaysia except the Johor sectors by a short time frame, while
regaining Johor and taking Singapore island determines how major the victory is.


Singapore Campaign:
"Total Wipeout"

Scenario in spoiler.
Spoiler : :
The player is ominously informed by a commander that two can play the wipeout game, and to
activate operation "(insert remarkably bland name)". The player gains no political points from
Singapore proper and must push north into Johor where some political points can be
gained. The player must hold Johor for a certain number of turns as a loss condition.
The player is given a large number of well-equipped shock/active conscript armoured,
infantry and support units to do so, while having to take Batam or Riau to the south in order to gain
the majority of political points (by preventing strategic, i.e. not in-game Indonesian artillery from being in range of
the island). The player must first take and then hold Johor for a certain number of turns as a loss condition, with other advances into the enemy's reinforcement sectors being for operational purposes only. If certain sectors along the Malaysian coastline can be taken, amphibious landings are made possible. Along the way, the player must hold off landings in Batam by Indonesian forces, by fighting in naval sectors or by actually engaging at the landing zones. The player's armoured initial invasion force will be blunted by the use of elite- and ATGM-infantry at close range in jungles, necessitating careful use of armour, infantry and support elements, and must rely on reservists toward the middle of the campaign, which have very low morale but are well-equipped, and hence cannot take too
many losses. Eventually, the player is given the option of calling in heavy armoured reinforcements, as well as a counter-strike force from naval sectors. How major the victory is will be determined by both the exchange ratio of the player's forces, and how many enemy formations are completely destroyed.


As for the deck, I believe it's possible to build a Singaporean deck with limited use of OOTF units.
Unfortunately, because I have limited knowledge of Malaysian and Indonesian cold war era
equipment, and because a lot of Singaporean equipment and doctrine from that era is still
classified (or rather, never came into service and subsequently never went out of service), we can only speculate, rather than provide a nearly-complete list. Nevertheless, some interesting units:

Spoiler : :
(including buffed AP AMX-13 SM1s, prototype Twardy, heavy armour, Fennec TOW-2, Fennec CRV-7+20mm ASTROS, Hawker Hunters, perhaps with Mavericks, SNEB, or AIM-9, protoype Bionix, munition carriers, 160mm mortar, M113 Igla protoype, Spike MR humvee-type vehicles, KAFV clones, F-5S ASF, A-4 SEAD and LGB/ATGM planes, various Stormer variants, Starburst)


could make it in, with a greater profusion of infantry. Most of these are about right for 1996 (not that Eugen sticks to timeframe religiously anyway). Maps ought also to be very infantry friendly, with masses of jungles and mountain terrain, with a few incorporating rolling plains with LOS defilade. Most of the equipment used by both sides already exists in game, made easier by the presence of DLC nations. Perhaps Singapore could get reserve counterparts to each type of infantry, artillery and vehicle, with reduced stats and slightly older basic equipment, but with equal cost and higher availability. Stuff like worsened panic thresholds, speed (infantry), stabilisers and unguided weapon accuracy. Kind of like the '90s and pre-'90s system. Regular units ought to have rather low availability.

No Leopard pls.
Also let's just forget the Armbrust ever existed that thing was shit.

User avatar
Eukie
Chief Warrant Officer
Posts: 541
Joined: Wed 23 Apr 2014 16:22
Contact:

Re: Future DLC’s for Wargame Red Dragon

Postby Eukie » Fri 26 Oct 2018 16:27

QFW wrote:Unfortunately, most SEA countries with the exception of Thailand, Singapore and Vietnam are not viable as standalone because a lot of key capabilities were not developed in the '80s and '90s, with most others being essentially counter-insurgency/internal security forces.


The biggest self-propelled artillery piece in Singapore's arsenal in this period is the 120 mm mortar. Their best tank is either a Centurion that's only rumoured to exist or the AMX-13 of Theseus. I wouldn't speak too highly of Singapore's key capabilities in Wargame terms.

QFW wrote:Also let's just forget the Armbrust ever existed that thing was shit.


*looks at Singaporean anti-tank weapons*

That leaves the M20 Super Bazooka and the Carl Gustav M2.

User avatar
FrangibleCover
Lieutenant
Posts: 1454
Joined: Mon 14 Nov 2016 21:34
Contact:

Re: Future DLC’s for Wargame Red Dragon

Postby FrangibleCover » Sat 27 Oct 2018 03:02

QFW wrote:A-4 SEAD

How good is your source for this? I'm aware of some English language sources of moderate quality claiming AGM-45 Shrike for Singapore, presumably on the A-4SU, that was replaced by HARM on the F-16As in the mid 90s. If you've got something really solid, like a picture, to corroborate the Shrike I'd be appreciative.

And Eukie's right, Singapore can't stand alone. Not even Thailand or Vietnam can stand alone. South East Asia is crap tank country so nobody had decent tanks or decent anti tank weapons so they're all kinda bad in a Wargame style mechanised combat environment.
What if Wargame stuck to timeframe?
Image

QFW
Private
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue 23 Oct 2018 18:19
Contact:

Re: Future DLC’s for Wargame Red Dragon

Postby QFW » Sun 4 Nov 2018 21:22

The biggest self-propelled artillery piece in Singapore's arsenal in this period is the 120 mm mortar.


Probably the only truly self-propelled Singaporean artillery piece of the timeframe.

*looks at Singaporean anti-tank weapons*

That leaves the M20 Super Bazooka and the Carl Gustav M2.


I don't recall ever seeing M20s, or any old lists that referred to M20s. The main (and I think first) section AT weapon of the period was some flavour of M72. Infantrymen were trained on the M72 from the late 60s until the mid '90s. If one does include the Armbrust it ought to be a sidegrade (and extra modelling work) - its only benefit was reduced backblast and a nice sight. But CGs are definitely still lying around in armouries. There were also 106mm RRs and MILANs, among others.

Their best tank is either a Centurion that's only rumoured to exist or the AMX-13 of Theseus. I wouldn't speak too highly of Singapore's key capabilities in Wargame terms.


I'm aware of some English language sources of moderate quality claiming AGM-45 Shrike for Singapore, presumably on the A-4SU, that was replaced by HARM on the F-16As in the mid 90s.


Perhaps you are both right! Although the relevant sources indicate that it was the plugged two-seat TA-4SU that most frequently carried Shrikes.

(If one ignores rumoured tanks, the largest calibre direct fire guns in service were AMX-10 PAC 90s)

And Eukie's right, Singapore can't stand alone. Not even Thailand or Vietnam can stand alone. South East Asia is crap tank country so nobody had decent tanks or decent anti tank weapons so they're all kinda bad in a Wargame style mechanised combat environment.


Oh well, one can dream!

Return to “Wargame : Red Dragon”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 18 guests