[MOD] Wargame: 1991

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FrangibleCover
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Re: [MOD] Wargame: 1991

Postby FrangibleCover » Mon 23 Sep 2019 12:08

libbmaster wrote:This mod is super cool! I have a question, if you're still around:

I noticed several infantry units use different models for their "lead" team member (the one with the RPG/LAW) and different models for the other units - how did you manage that? And do you know if you can edit the textures of the two models independently?

Oh yes, we're still here. I expect we'll be here until the forums or game die entirely.

The sergeant (lead) model is different from the clone soldiers. You can change one without affecting the others. It's inside the GroupeCombatModuleDescriptor, GfxWeaponModels.
GfxWeaponModel holds the soldiers model and effects.
GfxSecondaryWeaponModel holds the sergeant model and effects.
To change a model, you simply need to change the four TDepictionDescritptors numbers in the DepictionAlternatives list with the ones of your choice.

I believe the texture is the same for both sergeant and soldiers, sadly. But you can always check it out. I've had a mess about with infantry skinning and it's kind of mind-bending so be warned.
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Re: [MOD] Wargame: 1991

Postby libbmaster » Thu 26 Sep 2019 08:28

FrangibleCover wrote:Oh yes, we're still here. I expect we'll be here until the forums or game die entirely.

The sergeant (lead) model is different from the clone soldiers. You can change one without affecting the others. It's inside the GroupeCombatModuleDescriptor, GfxWeaponModels.
GfxWeaponModel holds the soldiers model and effects.
GfxSecondaryWeaponModel holds the sergeant model and effects.
To change a model, you simply need to change the four TDepictionDescritptors numbers in the DepictionAlternatives list with the ones of your choice.

I believe the texture is the same for both sergeant and soldiers, sadly. But you can always check it out. I've had a mess about with infantry skinning and it's kind of mind-bending so be warned.


Worked perfectly - thanks!

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Re: [MOD] Wargame: 1991

Postby shomu1 » Sat 19 Oct 2019 04:48

So found out something today, AH-1 wasn't able to fire TOW-2A until like 2005-ish due to the M65 TSU's inability to interface with the TOW-2A. An airframe change to the AH-1W rectified this, but AH-1T is SOL since it was long retired by that time.
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IT IS FREEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

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Re: [MOD] Wargame: 1991

Postby KIAyuyu » Mon 17 Feb 2020 18:52

I really like this mod and i think that the changes to inf and changes of weapon icon are amazing. I have recommended the mod to my Chinese wargame community and received lots of postive feedbacks on it. After having a closer look at the data and discussion with the community, we feel confused by some of the changes and worried about the balance. For example,
Why there is no btr80a or mi-28 for ussr? While there is AP/HE rocket system for many MLRS, can't soviet's MLRS do the same thing?
I understand that the average fire control and optics device of the redfor is worse than blufor, but sound't be applied on certain units. T80U and T72B 1989 are now considered as the new super heavy but they have poor optics while the entriy M1 abrams family have the medium optics. I don't think it's reasonable.
There are many questions with each nation related to units, but in general the main issue will be price, availabity and training level setting that makes its PVP balance worse than the original game.
But we all like it, after many year's vanilla gaming, we can really use a mod like this to get some new taste.
I hope the team are still working on update the mod and fix the errors and balancing. Thanks them for this great mod QWQ

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Re: [MOD] Wargame: 1991

Postby FrangibleCover » Wed 19 Feb 2020 00:08

KIAyuyu wrote:I really like this mod and i think that the changes to inf and changes of weapon icon are amazing. I have recommended the mod to my Chinese wargame community and received lots of postive feedbacks on it.

And thank you very much for your post, and for helping to keep this game going.

Why there is no btr80a or mi-28 for ussr?

Neither were in full service in 1991. A few prototypes of each existed but they were not intended to be deployable, indeed the Mi-28 was supposed to fade into obscurity having lost the new attack helicopter competition to the Ka-50.

While there is AP/HE rocket system for many MLRS, can't soviet's MLRS do the same thing?

Strangely the Soviet Union never deployed DP or AP bomblets on its rocket launchers. Quite an oversight by them in my view but obviously they felt that unitary explosives and fragmentation bomblets were more suitable for what they intended to do.

I understand that the average fire control and optics device of the redfor is worse than blufor, but sound't be applied on certain units. T80U and T72B 1989 are now considered as the new super heavy but they have poor optics while the entriy M1 abrams family have the medium optics. I don't think it's reasonable.

I certainly understand this concern, medium vs. poor optics have been assigned purely based on whether a vehicle had thermal optics fitted to it. Top end RED fire control was every bit the equal of BLU but they never really got thermals out on a significant level and we've chosen to represent that even if it does make RED harder to play in some circumstances. RED tanks are, of course, cheaper as a result and I'd suggest using the RED technical reconnaissance units to compensate now that Exceptional Optics is not so heavily taxed.

There are many questions with each nation related to units, but in general the main issue will be price, availabity and training level setting that makes its PVP balance worse than the original game.
But we all like it, after many year's vanilla gaming, we can really use a mod like this to get some new taste.
I hope the team are still working on update the mod and fix the errors and balancing. Thanks them for this great mod QWQ

With only volunteer development and a limited playerbase it's rather difficult to balance the game even to the questionable extent that Eugen managed, but we are committed to continued improvement in this area. Perhaps we should have changed fewer things!
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Re: [MOD] Wargame: 1991

Postby KIAyuyu » Wed 19 Feb 2020 11:02

Thanks for your reply, it definitely helped a lot for me to understand your design reasoning.
Just want to ask, is Eukie's post on 26 Aug 2019 the newest update? Or do you have another new update available on discord? Do you still update the information of the mod at Eugen Form?
And is there a link for the newest version of 1991 mod so that I don't need to download each small update, I just realized that I was playing the older version of the mod and my mod manager's auto-updater didn't work.

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Re: [MOD] Wargame: 1991

Postby FrangibleCover » Wed 19 Feb 2020 14:13

Updates on the forums aren't necessarily the latest updates, I'd recommend using the Discord for everything. We also include a slim last-patch only update on Discord.
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Re: [MOD] Wargame: 1991

Postby FrangibleCover » Thu 2 Apr 2020 01:13

HUGE UPDATE
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Which can be downloaded from the Discord as usual, including some updated skins.

Today's update has added Southern Block, consisting of the three Warsaw Pact nations not previously in Wargame: Bulgaria, Romania and Hungary.

Southern Block - A Unit Summary

As part of the latest patch to the 1991 Mod, Canada has been reroled into Southern Block and its technological distinctiveness absorbed into the American Collective. Southern Block is a three-nation group of Bulgaria, Romania and Hungary and represents the southern end of the Non Soviet Warsaw Pact Nations that would be tasked with invading Austria and Turkey, or possibly Yugoslavia, in the event of a Third World War. Like the current NSWP they use mostly Soviet hand-me-down equipment but they have a few things to bring to the table.

Spoiler : Bulgaria: :
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Bulgaria is the most loyal of the Warsaw Pact states, being jokingly referred to as the Fourteenth Republic of the Soviet Union, and brings the most technologically advanced weapons systems to Southern Block. They also had a domestic arms industry which was terrible but “successfully” produced the BMP-23, an IFV that answers the question of how you would build a BMP-2 if all you had access to was a Gvozdika, a ZU-23-2 and about fifty Bulgarian Lev.

Logistic:
Mi-2 KShV - Bulgaria’s only contribution to the logistics tab, a fairly predictable unit but a necessary one.

FOB - It belongs to all three nations but the Mi-2 looked lonely here.

Infantry:
Kashimeria - Well equipped line infantry carrying an RPG-7 firing PG-7VL rockets. With 21AP these are some of the best AT lines in REDFOR and their selection of transports is fairly acceptable.

PZRK Igla-1 - Really the most direct example of Bulgaria’s status as the Fourteenth Republic. Exactly like the Soviet one except a tiny bit worse.

Tikhina - The 65th Maritime Special Reconnaissance Detachment of the Bulgarian Navy form an elite corps of doorkickers, with a 15 man unit like many naval SF, RPG-22s to allow them to cleave through vehicles as quickly as they do through infantry, and both ground and air transports. Uniquely, they have access to the Mi-14 naval helicopter since they occasionally used them as transports.

Support:
2S1 Karamfil - A perfectly normal Gvozdika. Bulgaria produced large numbers of these although many seem to have been exported to the Soviet Union. Also used by Hungary and in smaller numbers by Romania.

2S3 Akatsiya - You know it. You tolerate it. If you want to deliver cheap 7HE in a PACT deck, accept no substitutes. Not that you have any. Also used by Hungary.

9K33M2 Osa-AK - Sadly we can’t evidence Bulgarian operation of the Osa-AKM so you’re stuck with its homeschooled half-brother.

9K35M Strela-10M - None of the fancy missiles here, just good old fashioned missing. Hungary also had a bare handful of these but most were in Bulgarian service.

SMM TMH - An 82mm mortar carrier on a Bulgarian built MT-LB chassis.

SMM B1 Tundzha - Exactly like the German one, which is also Bulgarian built. The PzMrs M113 of the Warsaw Pact.

R-2 - Bulgaria purchased the RM-51 MRL back in the deep mists of time and gave it an even more brief designation. Luckily it’s Wargame, so old means cheap and cheap means good. Enjoy your point blank infantry deletion!

Tank:
T-55A - What is there to say about the most produced tank of all time? All three nations had these, as well as half of the other countries on Earth.

T-72M1 - I’m really running out of useful things to say here. Operated by Bulgaria and Hungary. You know what, I’m actually going to use this opportunity to rail against the mythology of the T-72 export series: They were exactly the same for 95% of purposes as Soviet production tanks, with the T-72M being equivalent to a late build T-72 and the T-72M1 being equivalent to the T-72A. There is no Monkey Model. Iraqis just can’t drive tanks.

T-62M - Bulgaria was the only T-62 export customer in the Warsaw Pact, or more precisely the only country which didn’t send the exported trials vehicles back as quickly as possible. It’s nice to get to reuse the T-62Cz model!

Recon:
BRM-23 Sova-1 - Bulgaria’s attempt at the BRM-1, a Gvozdika chassis equipped with a 23mm 2A14 cannon from a ZU-23-2. Sort of like the Snezka and sort of like clinical depression. At least it can see its impending demise clearly.

Mi-1R - How low do you have to be to get hand me down units from vanilla China? As low as Bulgaria apparently. I have no idea how these things were still serviceable in 1991.

PT-76B - A unique and powerful reconnaissance ta… hahaha no it’s the same as it always was.

T-55AM - Bulgaria brings Southern Block’s true recon tank, a perfectly normal T-55AM.

RGSN - The 68th Independent Parachute-Reconnaissance Regiment, Bulgaria’s Spetsnaz. The S actually stands for Spetsnaz but god alone knows we have enough units called that already. These guys have similar equipment to vanilla’s GRU and a similar role.

UAZ-469 - Nice.

Vehicles:
9P148 - The BRDM-2 based Konkurs carrier. Used by all three nations and practically everyone else.

BTR-60PA - Oh, now we’re nicking units from North Korea? A fairly workable wheeled transport, the open top doesn’t matter much since transports are all dead if they take a cluster hit anyway.

BTR-60PB - Vroom vroom, I’m in me hegemonic overlord’s car.

MT-LB - Built in great numbers in Bulgaria and used, as usual, to carry bloody everything.

BMP-23 - Bulgaria’s attempt at the BMP-2, a Gvozdika chassis equipped with a 23mm 2A14 cannon from a ZU-23-2. By all accounts a horrible IFV, with a mis-positioned turret that prevented efficient disembarkation, a two-axis stabiliser that didn’t work and useless suspension that meant even if the stabiliser worked it wouldn’t work. Happily none of that matters in Wargame and it’s basically like a BMP-2 with a Malyutka instead.

BMP-23A - Some BMP-23s were equipped with a Fagot launcher rather than a Malyutka launcher and good luck to ‘em.

Helicopter:
Mi-8T - Used by all three nations for everything it’s possible to use a helicopter for.

Mi-24V - The advanced attack Hind, fitted with deadly Kokon ATGMs and S-8 rockets. Used by Bulgaria and Hungary, with Bulgaria's 40 or so aircraft forming an exceptionally strong force compared to what Greece and Turkey could muster.

Mi-17 - Like an Mi-8 except the tail rotor goes the other way! Don’t actually check this on the model though, we don’t have enough Mi-17 models to go around. Equipped with S-8 rockets.

Mi-14PL - A naval reconnaissance and submarine hunting helicopter pressed into service with the Bulgarian Naval Special Forces as a transport. Has Medium optics, like the Lynx HAS.3 and other pressed naval helicopters, due to its advanced radar fit.

Plane:
Su-22M4 - Something a bit different, a SEAD aircraft equipped with a single SEAD missile and a pair of cluster bombs, to allow it to charge down a turned-off radar AA unit and cluster it to death. A risky job, so another hardpoint carries the SPS-141 jammer and disposable countermeasures, an RWR and special role training bring the unit up to 40% ECM.

Su-25K - They said it couldn’t be done. They probably couldn’t do it, honestly, but we can! A unit with Kh-25ML AGMs and ZB-250 napalm bombs which can dive in, shoot off its missiles to crack transports open and then napalm the infantry disembarking.

MiG-21MF - All three nations operated MiG-21s in great array and upgraded MFs remain in service in Romania as the LanceR-C. This one carries S-8 rocket pods to provide a fast and reactive attack option.

MiG-23BN - Bulgaria was the only Southern Block nation to operate the droop-snoot MiG-23 variant. This one carries FAB-500s as the fast, survivable bomber of the nation.

MiG-23MLD - Another unique Bulgarian unit, only Bulgaria and Syria were trusted with the advanced MLD variant outside of the Soviet union. This example carries the traditional pair of R-73s but swaps the more usual R-24Rs for R-23Rs to put it in a more useful place relative to the MiG-29.


Spoiler : Romania: :
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Romania is the rebel child of the Southern Block: The local strongman Nicolae Ceaușescu had fairly poor relations with the Soviet Union and refused to take part in the invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968. This resulted in an army mostly focused on the defensive, as much to prevent Soviet reassertion of control as to oppose the depredations of NATO, and a strong local technological base with unusual levels of cooperation with foreign countries to replace some of what the Soviet Union refused to provide. Ceaușescu’s wife, Elena, was by all accounts absolutely barking but liked to play at being a chemist. She had significant control over the military budget so many Romanian weapons emphasise battlefield use of chemicals, especially incendiaries.

Logistic:
ARO 240 - Kind of like the Yugoslav Fiat Campagnola copy, a Jeep CV that goes fast.

TAB-71A-R-1451 - This is either a Romanian BTR-60 based command vehicle or a CD key for Elena Ceaușescu’s Chemistry Is Fun on the Commodore 64.

MLI-84 PCB - A Romanian built BMP-1, disarmed and fitted with a set of radios making it suitable for use as a command vehicle.

TR-77K - Romania’s heavily armoured and undergunned monster tank makes a perfect choice for Southern Block’s Tank CV.

MLVM ABAL - An armoured supply vehicle for Romania’s mountaineers.

DAC 667T - A Romanian truck in the 7 ton range, just like all the others.

Infantry:
Chimiști - The Chemical Warfare Troops of the Romanian Army were the elite, superbly trained and equipped with domestically developed weapons such as the AGI-3x40 incendiary grenade launcher. All Romanian formations were supported by Chimiști and they were intended to lead assaults against enemy positions. As a result they have been equipped more like Spetsnaz Hunters than traditional sappers, helping them to get up on enemy infantry and then blow them away with their AGIs.

Grupa Suport - An SPG-9 team using Romanian domestic ammunition

Infanteriști - Romania’s regulars, left ill-equipped with only PG-7VM rockets but cheap for it.

Parașutiști - Romania’s Airborne corps was large and well trained but suffer from the same equipment issues as the rest of Romania’s infantry. At least you get fifteen of them?

RAD Fagot-M - All three nations had Fagot-M missiles and launchers, but the Romanians have the coolest name.

RAP CA-94 - Romania operated a modified Strela-2M which is probably quite similar to the Yugoslav Strela-2M/A. You’ll still miss everything, but you’ll scare your opponent slightly more.

Vanatori de Munte - The Mountain Hunters. Romania has large mountainous areas and the VM received significant investment including their own dedicated APCs. Not enough investment to buy them decent anti-tank weapons, but on the other hand if you can get a tank up the Carpathians you deserve the win.

Support:

9K33M2 Osa-AK - Romania operated the Osa-AK and also had a unit of the advanced Osa-AKM defending Cluj-Napoca, presumably against Hungarians.

2K12M3 Kub-Z - Another case where all nations operate a unit but Romania brings the coolest name. A Kub-M3 like every other though.

CA-95 - The Strela-1M system built domestically with an improved seeker head and mounted atop a Romanian TABC-79. Yes, I know in the game it looks like it’s atop a BRDM-2 but I assure you that is an optical illusion.

40 APRA 122 FMC - A very complicated way of saying a Grad derivative on a Romanian DAC truck, with improved FCS and an autoloading system to improve fire cycle time.

SU-76 - Oh boy, it’s back! Acting sort of like REDFOR’s answer to the AML-60 this vehicle has a short range and 2HE but a blistering rate of fire and fast aim that allows it to hose opposition away.

MLVM AR md.89 - A 120mm mortar carrier on the MLVM chassis using an advanced fire control system, which is unusual for a mortar carrier.

TAT A346 md.80 - Despite being a truck with a gun on the back, it has a surprisingly nice radar-guided fire-control system. More equivalent to the old Canadian Oerlikon truck than the usual ZU-23-2.

Tank:
T-55AM2R - Like the normal one, but with the Kladivo replaced with a slightly superior Ciclop FCS built in Romania, probably the best fire control system of the non-Soviet Warsaw Pact on paper. Unfortunately it is also equipped with Romanian ammunition for the D-10T, so HEAT only. Use as a missile carrier.

TR-77 - The greatest meme of any unit in this whole update. I personally guarantee it. A T-55 derivative built domestically in Romania with a massive armour upgrade which seems to have involved just straight up welding another 200mm of steel to the front of the tank. Extremely British and I approve greatly. The TR-77 is still firing the ammunition that Stalin delivered and has no interesting fire control components so it’s going to be very difficult to price correctly! Latest feedback from our test players has been mainly screaming.

TR-85 - An update of the TR-77 with a new engine and the Ciclop fire control system. A slightly more traditionally-balanced unit, but still lacking in AP.

TR-125 - A Romanian tank with a decent gun! Romania’s answer to the Wilk, Palcat and T-72B: A domestic T-72 derivative with a superb engine, excellent armour, a Ciclop derived fire control system and finally a domestically developed APFSDS round that can punch the tickets of lesser vehicles easily.

Recon:
BRDM-2 - Operated by Bulgaria and Romania, in addition to Romania’s operation of the TABC-79 which is essentially a shortened BTR to do exactly the same thing as a BRDM-2.

BIM - The Romanian Marines were assigned to the Danube delta area to do reconnaissance and deep operation missions and are therefore a shock recon unit.

IAR-316B Alouette - Romania had good relations with France and license-produced multiple Aerospatiale helicopters, including this Alouette III equipped with S-5 rocket launchers.

ARO 24 Cercetasi - This jeep carries the Romanian made AGA-40 md.85 grenade launcher to give it a bit more punch.

Vehicle:
DAC-655T - A diesel powered truck that is the Romanian success story of international exports, finding its way to anywhere from Hungary to Egypt to the United States. It’s diesel engine was particularly sought after, being used to upgraded Soviet gasoline trucks for the diesel ecosystem of the 1980s in countries such as Hungary and Cuba and it’s a truck how much do you expect us to write about it?

TAB-71M - Romania acquired a license for the BTR-60PB and promptly decided to tinker, upgrading the engines and replacing the turret with a new, anti-aircraft capable version.

TAB-77 - Romania also acquired a license for the BTR-70, which was locally upgraded with the TAB-71M’s anti-aircraft turret.

B33 Zimbru - Romania even acquired a license for the BTR-80, which they modified to have significantly thicker frontal armour capable of withstanding heavy machine gun fire at close range.

Mli-84 - The locally produced version of the BMP-1, with a lengthened hull, an extra roadwheel, and a DShK mounted on the rear deck. It sounds pretty neat until you realize that this thing was built in the 1980s and even Bulgaria had realized the 73 mm low-pressure gun was garbage at that point.

E: Eukie would like me to clarify that the Mli-84 has an extra roadwheel on each side, otherwise it would only go in circles.

MLVM - A unique armoured personnel carrier designed for operation in mountainous areas. The MLVM is based on the SU-76 chassis but carries the high-elevation KPVT turret from a TAB and is fully amphibious. Sadly it doesn’t carry anything resembling armour so it’s more like a tracked BTR-60 than a true IFV.

DAC MR-4 - Another DAC truck, this one an older model with a ZPTU-4 in the back. In Romanian service these were intended to transport and support CA-94 MANPADS teams so it acts somewhat like a crappy wheeled Strelabus.

9P133 - The BRDM-2 based Malyutka carrier. The Malyutka was very popular in Romania specifically because it was cheap and could be domestically manufactured, although all three nations operated them.

AT-100 - An SU-100, upgraded by Romania for reasons probably best known to Romania.

T-152 - The ISU-152K, an uparmoured version of the iconic Beast-killer, ready to sling 7HE direct fire at any infantry in your way. Somewhat ironic that a mod which is about getting rid of worthless old units has ended up with this thing.The AVRE of REDFOR.

Helicopter:
IAR-330L Puma - By violating UN sanctions to sell weapons to apartheid South Africa and exploiting their close relationship with France, Romania was able to manufacture upgraded and heavily armed Puma helicopters. Standard fit for transport activities seems to have been a pair of NR-23 cannons in pods on the fuselage and some S-5 rockets on stub wings like an Mi-8.

IAR-330L - The Puma was also Romania’s main heavy attack platform, carrying an increased number of S-5 rockets and some Malyutka ATGMs. I didn’t say that it was a good heavy attack platform, just that it was their main one.

Plane:
IAR-93A Vultur - The IAR-93 series was a cooperation with Yugoslavia, who built the aircraft as the J-22 Orao. The aircraft uses significant amounts of Western avionics and Western engines to produce an indigenous strike aircraft that isn’t dependent on Soviet assistance to remain operational. Unfortunately the Romanian ones were even worse than the Yugoslav ones, sharing their chronic power issues and also apparently being fitted with no electronic countermeasures whatsoever. The initial production A aircraft carries a number of small bombs.

IAR-93MB Vultur - The MB variant of the Vultur is the Motor de Baza, an upgraded B airframe with better aerodynamics and fuel storage but the original engines. This example carries the Romanian developed CL 250 cluster bomb.

IAR-93B Vultur - The B variant of the Vultur had both a new airframe and new afterburning variants of the Viper engine that solved some of the issues with power generation. As befits the most advanced Romanian made aircraft in the mod this one carries as much napalm as it possibly can, ready to burn out infantry who aren’t in hard cover.

MiG-23MF - Romania’s MiG-23s were the fighter variant, but interestingly they seem to have also been tasked with the majority of Romania’s precision strike work using the Kh-23M missile. One wonders how good they’d have been in a dogfight, since the MiG-23 was not an easy aircraft to use at the best of times and strike training would cut into air combat training hours.

MiG-29 - The same as always, Romania and Bulgaria were both provided with a squadron of MiG-29 ASFs in the late 1980s and they represent the best fighters available to Southern Block. Which is pretty sad really because they’re not very good in the grand scheme of things.

IAR-99 Soim - Romania also decided to build a jet trainer using the Viper engines that they had on license for the Vultur. The result was a pretty little aircraft fairly similar to every other jet trainer in the game, except forced to carry rockets because the traditional 500kg bombs won’t fit on the hardpoints.


Spoiler : Hungary: :
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Southern Block’s hanger-on nation, the least capable of the three individually. Hungary was occupied by the Soviet Union in 1956 and put under very close supervision. To pacify the population a programme of “Goulash Communism” was instituted, with reduced military spending and some of the highest standards of living within COMECON. Lovely if you’re Hungarian but not much use if you’d like to play them in Wargame.

Logistic:
SZDPK-PSZH - A command vehicle conversion of the PSZH personnel carrier.

Parancsnokság - Command infantry, equipped with the SZVD marksman rifle.

Szállító Mi-8 - An Mi-8 used for transporting supplies. Like the command infantry this could come with any of the three nations and we’re just using Hungarian names as a wind-up.

Infantry:
Ejtőernyősök - Hungary’s 34th Deep Reconnaissance Battalion, broadly equivalent to FJB-40. Elite infantry equipped with the rubbish PG-7VM anti tank rocket which keeps them lovely and cheap.

Gépesített Lövészek - Perfectly normal line infantry using Hungarian transports.

Support:
2SZ1 Lőelemképző - Hungary’s first genuinely unique unit, a 2S1 Gvozdika with the Arpad-M fire control system giving it a very competitive aim time.

BM-21 Grad - What else is there to say about the iconic multiple rocket launcher? Yeah, nothing.

ZSZU-57-2 Büszke - Hungary and Bulgaria were both quite reliant on the old 57-2 for their mobile AA cover. Hungarian ones were nicknamed “Bueszke”, meaning brave. Taking these up against Apaches, they probably were.

ZSZU-23-4 Silka - Hungary had a relatively small number of Shilkas which were used for air defence of the 11th Tank Division, the only Hungarian formation with any particular offensive potential.

Tank:
T-72A - Hungary was the only non-Soviet Warsaw Pact state to receive Soviet-production standard T-72As, but the Nadboi radiation liner makes no difference to performance in Wargame so it’s just a Bulgarian T-72M1 with worse ammunition.

Recon:
FÚG - A Hungarian built reconnaissance car, similar to the BRDM-1 but different. Already in the game as the Czechoslovak OT-65 but now finally coming home!

BRM-1K - Offering the choice of a rubbish gun instead of a rubbish autocannon for your exceptional optics vehicle.

Felderítők Csoport - Regular reconnaissance infantry, equipped without particular uniqueness.

Mélységi Felderítők - Elite reconnaissance ‘snipers’, using the indigenous Gepárd M1 anti-materiel rifle firing 12.7mm bullets. Useful for taking out enemy light vehicles such as CVs or AA behind the lines.

Vehicle:
PSZH - An update of the FÚG reconnaissance car to be able to transport a squad of infantry without a significant size change, presumably made with the assistance of Ernő Rubik. Functionally like a BTR-60 but Small size for extreme missile dodging action.

PSZH-F - The F is for Findy-boi. No it’s not it’s for Felderítők but this is still the recon transport variant.

BMP-1 - A difficult unit for Hungary to operate, since the high standards of living meant that finding eight conscripts who would fit in the back was increasingly hard.

UAZ SZPG-9 - You can carry one of these in the back of an Mi-8! You shouldn’t, but you totally can.

UAZ Fagot - For when a Fagot team with their transport looks just too expensive.

Helicopter:
Mi-24D - The Hungarian one is in its transport role, carrying a pair of GUV-8700 9A624 gunpods which give it another pair of Yak-Bs and four GShG 7.62 gatling guns. Approach with caution.

Mi-24D - Still in widespread service with Bulgaria and Hungary, this one being used as a traditional attacker.

Plane:
MiG-21Bisz - The classic helohunter has taken a bit of a beating in Hungarian service, with no multiple-racks available for the R-60 missiles and no scab-on countermeasures dispensers. Still, Hungary had a number of aircraft configured with both the Lazur GCI and Polyot ILS systems which were available to be ruthlessly slaughtered by Eagle spam on the other side of the curtain.

Szu-22M-3K - Hungary only operated the earlier version of the Su-22 with less advanced avionics, and we have no evidence to suggest it got the survivability features common on the M4 versions, but it can still carry huge Kh-29 bunker-busting missiles and use them to crack tanks open like a traditional Magyar warbow against an eggshell.


This concludes the summary of added units, unless Phlogis and vLern change stuff while I’m not looking in which case this concludes some of a summary of some added units and download the mod to find out where I’m wrong!
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raptor910
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Joined: Sun 28 Apr 2013 21:14
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Re: [MOD] Wargame: 1991

Postby raptor910 » Wed 15 Apr 2020 18:41

Any thoughts on building a campaign or at least modding one to make use of the new assets, again with the focus on a realistic setup from 1991 (or earlier)?

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